THE TV CARPENTER : Home Makeovers with Wayne Perrey

Wayne chats with Nick Snow TV Interior Designer

February 21, 2020 Wayne / Nick Snow Season 12 Episode 26
THE TV CARPENTER : Home Makeovers with Wayne Perrey
Wayne chats with Nick Snow TV Interior Designer
Chapters
THE TV CARPENTER : Home Makeovers with Wayne Perrey
Wayne chats with Nick Snow TV Interior Designer
Feb 21, 2020 Season 12 Episode 26
Wayne / Nick Snow

This week I chat with Nick Snow,
Interior Designer and TV Stylist

Guest: www.Nicksnowinteriors.co.uk


Sponsor: To take advantage of the generous 15% discount from my sponsor Thorndown, please visit http://bit.ly/TVCarpenter. Discount code: TVCarpenter

Contact me: Wayne Perrey on Twitter and Instagram.

Music: "What's the Angle" by Shane Ivers

Show Notes Transcript

This week I chat with Nick Snow,
Interior Designer and TV Stylist

Guest: www.Nicksnowinteriors.co.uk


Sponsor: To take advantage of the generous 15% discount from my sponsor Thorndown, please visit http://bit.ly/TVCarpenter. Discount code: TVCarpenter

Contact me: Wayne Perrey on Twitter and Instagram.

Music: "What's the Angle" by Shane Ivers

Speaker 1:

Today I chat with Nick snow whose interior designs are known for being fabulously flamboyant with a sprinkle of SAS .

Speaker 2:

I can say, I like to think I'm quite fabulous. Um, I do, you know, I do take design really , really seriously. Uh, but at the same time I think it's really important to have fun with it. And you know, I think that's what makes you a great designer is if you're just a down to earth, great person or you know, normal person, it's just really good at what they do. So I just thought to myself, you know, well , I'm just going to spread my wings and I'm going to fly because that's what people want.

Speaker 3:

[inaudible]

Speaker 1:

hello and welcome to the TV carpenter, the podcast where I, Wayne Perry inspire you to create your dream home by interviewing my friends from the world of interior design and garden make-over shows this week for me is all about planning this Easter's ideal home show. So the ideal home show is in Olympia, London and uh, I'll be working there over, it's about three weeks show, end of March, first two weeks of April. And I'll be doing my usual DIY talks and upcycling talks on their super theater stage. But also, as I've mentioned before, I'll be recording this podcast. So I'll be their resident T V carpenter, podcaster and, and there's a new stage that they've created called the room set stage where and whether it be a live audience and I'll have some cool guests being interviewed. I've got a few lined up next week I'll be able to announce them cause them be finalized and their dates that they'll be doing will be finalized. But I'm really pleased with the people who've agreed to come along and have a chat. And as a way of saying thank you to you, I want to offer you , um , a pair of free tickets. Actually, I'm going to be giving away four tickets or two pairs of tickets for the idle home show, which can be used over any of the three weeks that are there. Um, and all you have to do is to get a ticket is to help me out. All you have to do is go to iTunes and click subscribe and leave a review. And then randomly I'll pick two winners, which will each get a pair of tickets. So go to the iTunes, go to TV , carpenter plus press subscribe and leave me a comment about the podcast. Hopefully it's a nice one cause you , you're listening to the podcast and you like it and I will post you , um , some tickets and now we'll announce those in the following podcast , um, as well and on social media and stuff. Um, but yes, so that's my way of saying thank you for making this podcast the huge success that it is. Um, and I , I couldn't have done it without you for listening. And also I've got to say a huge thank you to my sponsor thorn down, so thrown down as we spoke before and amazing eco woodwork paint, but also they have a pretty cool , um, glass peelable paint, which is perfect for blocking out conservatories or creating some kind of interesting designs in your, in your greenhouse. So I had a little chat with Caroline and Ben who are the owners of phoned down. I went to their head office and chatted with them and they were telling me the interesting places where people have used the glass peelable paint your paints have been used. Um, I won a lot of art projects and a lot of stain glass effects and things. Where have you seen them used to? Great effect.

Speaker 4:

Well I think Linda's greenhouse was gorgeous. The one I mentioned earlier where she um, she painted of each panel a different translucent color. It just looks absolutely beautiful. Then I used to work at Wells cathedral and the Clark of the works was very sweet and he let me paint my peelable glass paints on a grade one listed medieval monument.

Speaker 5:

He's losing his job as we speak . Yeah . It all peeled off and

Speaker 4:

yeah, it was a beautiful sort of medieval office. Um, and it had the original sort of tutor panel in and I'm at the, the glass was different , all of the leaded sort of diamond glass and it was just absolutely gorgeous. So on one of the windows I painted of different opaque colors, so they had like the more [inaudible] heritage tones on there. Then on the double window, I painted the translucent colors. So that was more of a traditional, subpar Liquin stained glass look. And it was absolutely stunning. It looks out on Wells of town square and the amount of comments that it got from people , um, was quite amazing tool these civic society can. I said , um, uh , so is , is this Coton ? Is it permanent? And I of said , no, it's not, don't worry. I will peel it off and yes, and I spent of a fun lunch break just peeling off all these different sort of diamonds or different colors.

Speaker 1:

It just proves how good throwing down is that it doesn't damage a cathedral stained glass window and that it was allowed to be painted on there. Um, but also you can get 15% discount to try out this paint , um , by going on the website phone down.co . Dot . UK. And if you type in the code T V carpenter, you get 15% discount off any of that online purchases. So it's well worth checking out of the website to see if you can take advantage of that amazing deal. Now to the main event I chat , I had a really cool chat with this guy called Nick snow . So Nick is , uh , I found him on Instagram. I saw some of his grid. I thought it looked absolutely beautiful and vibrant and if you check out his grid next now on a scrum , you'll see what the, see what I mean. So I , I'd actually, I make a point of, of trying to find people and you know, to um , to spreading the love and saying that I like their work and uh, and he was one person and then when the interior design masters was being shown on TV, he used to do a live , um, lack of running commentary of the show. So I used to watch the show and then I'd go back and look over his , uh, Instagram stories and would be literally pier myself cause he was so funny. So I thought he would be brilliant to get on this, on the podcast, knowing that his grid was good and that his talent was good. I knew he was an interior designer, but then when I got to chat with him, I suddenly realized he, he's done everything and the knowledge that he has and he's currently works in TV, which I didn't know. And he , um, he knows what it's like to be behind the camera and in front of the camera, but also he was full of some amazing top tips and he also has courses. The guy's knowledge is endless. So I came off the phone and my wife was like, Oh, how was the , um, the podcast recording? I went, it was bloody brilliant. Actually. It was far more that than I thought I got the far more from it than I actually thought thought it was. And also his personality is hugely infectious. So I hope you enjoy this , uh, interview in this chat with the fabulous Nick's now. No, thank you for being on the podcast.

Speaker 2:

Thanks Wayne. Thanks so much for having me on.

Speaker 6:

No, it's brilliant. I first became aware of you through your Instagram. So while interior design masters was on, I used to watch it and then I would go and watch your Instagram live feed to say, see what your thoughts were of the show. Did you enjoy watching the show?

Speaker 2:

Oh, we had some, me and mother have had so much fun. You know, I think for me it was that kind of moment where I could take myself away from obviously doing my job every single day and it's really stressful. So it's kind of though that evening, once a week where I could just sit down, put the TV on and watch, you know , a couple of friends that I've met through Instagram, like Nikki and Jerome, you know, they were on there . Um, and for me it was just a , a way to kind of just have a bit of fun watching it really and just kind of enjoy it. And it was all lighthearted farther than that, you know, I totally respect everyone that was on there because years ago I was on a a make over show my style . So I kind of get, you know how it will work . No work in TV now. So it was one of those things where, you know, it was just all fun and I , I kind of know how it all works and how it goes. But you know, I was really rooting for Nikki obviously cause she is one of my really good friends. So yeah I really enjoyed that . But yeah it's just a bit fun .

Speaker 6:

I do know what I love though cause obviously I knew the outcome and I actually watched it with Nicky licky lives two streets away from me and we're really good friends so I'm, I was watching it with her. I love her. She's brilliant and so talented. And what was interesting, there was a moment going, you and your , your the half Adam going, if Nikki goes out, Oh I'm not watching it, I'm not watching it . Next week cut to Nikki goes out and I was going, what's he going to do? Is he going to come back next week and they got to do it and you couldn't keep away .

Speaker 2:

We thought we'd give our viewers a bit because if high , no , you know, we fought with, you know , let y'all think that we weren't coming back, but you know , we did, we came back, we have to note . It was really fun. And while I was , I really support Nick fought no , she's incredible. Anyway, it was still interesting to see how it, how it finished off in the end cause no , it was a really great show to watch and I think following on from the great terror design challenge , um, all those many years ago, I mean how that kind of adapted from Twitter, you know, it was very much when that was on is all about watching Twitter and seeing what everyone's reactions was. Um , so back then I kind of got involved with that and then this time it was such , you know what, I'm going to put my face to it. And that's how they have fun with it. So yeah, really enjoyed it . And I still stand by the fact that I should be judged next on the next series, but who knows what will happen,

Speaker 6:

who knows, who knows. We'll have a word, what's going to happen. So , um, you said that you'd been in, you know, how TV works, so you'd been involved in a TV show before. So what was that? What have you worked on?

Speaker 2:

Well, you know , I actually go wait , going back sort of seven years now, I was on a kind of interiors challenge, so which ha , it's kind of something that I put behind me because I watched it and I just felt so awful. I mean, and then that kind of wanted to get me into TV . You know, I really enjoyed the , uh, the, the meeting everyone and meet people and everyone was such fun characters. Uh, that it kind of gave me that sentence. Think Joe, I want to work on some TV makeover shows. So that kind of show that I resolved , uh, mentioned their names. I don't want anyone to watch it because I feel really bad. I was kind of really yacht , but I'm not young. But I was, you know, it was, it was one of those things where I watched back and I think, Oh my God, why did I say that? I suppose everyone does stuff on TV, but , um, I , I , I take, I learned a lot from it and I evolved and then I started working behind the scenes obviously with, within TV . So I've done quite a few homemaker shows. I've worked in Sonic house and Matt Lauer with workloads . So I currently work from Sarah beanie , um , and then working on some other shows as well. Um , so yeah, it's, for me it's about meeting great people. And I think one of the reasons why I love the TV shows is because you can be yourself and I have kind of done so much in the field, you know, living at such a magazine styling and there's so much of , uh, different paths, different avenues. But for me it's just important to stay true to yourself and just be relaxed in what you do rather than they're , my absolute would be walking around in a suit every day times be really, really professional because I just like to have a laugh, but at the same time do a really, really good job when it comes to design. So yeah, TV I think kind of ticks all those boxes for me.

Speaker 6:

Yeah. Cause on your, on your website , um, Nick's , no interiors dot code at UK, you're opening strapline is a fabulous leaf and flamboyant with a sprinkle of SAS . So I think that's as soon as you are,

Speaker 2:

to me it's , you know, there was so many years where I tried to be this person that, you know, was very, very professional and very kind of, I had to be someone else I think a lot of the time to because I thought that's what society or the industry wanted me to be. Um, and it I think helped me not quite a lot, you know, and quite, you know, fun. I like I say, I like to concur quite fabulous. Um, but I do, you know, I do take design really, really seriously. Uh, but at the same time I think it's really important to have fun with it. And you know, I think that's what makes you a great designer is if you're just a down to earth, great person or you know, normal person that is just really good at what they do. So I just thought to myself, do you know what? I'm just going to spread my wings and I'm going to fly because that's, that's what people want. And that's what people kind of PSAT . They buy into.

Speaker 6:

No, absolutely. Absolutely

Speaker 2:

boring interiors. So for me it's all about pops of color. It's all about fun. It's all about, yeah , but with a side of sophistication, you see. So I feel like relate to my personality too. That is something that's quite important now to my brand.

Speaker 6:

Yeah. I think I, I've always said people buying to people. So even on my website, there's a big mugshot of my face on the front glass. He , so many people have web websites and they don't have any pictures of them. So you'll see all the amazing work. But you, and it's like if someone walks into your house or someone's selling you something, you almost buy from the person, not actually the product. So I think what I've looked, what I loved about your Instagram and about all, you know, everything that I've read about you before we even decided to do this podcast interview with you was I knew what you were about. I knew who you were, the personality who you were met was quite infectious. And I thought, well actually he'd be fun to create stuff. And also I imagine some of your clients, and I see it all the time, clients are nervous about getting into designers in. So when they get someone like you who they can have a laugh with and you know, and just go , well you know, talk off school and go , well that's rubbish. You don't like that or like that and just just grow together. I think people do. Do you find that your, your clients feel that when they come speak to speak to you?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, because that's so kind of, you'd say that's really nice and it's lovely to hear that, that it profession of wine giving out does come across because I think that's the most important thing. But absolutely. I mean, like I said, I, I work with so many different people. I not there working with sort of billionaires because I just, you know, that's not really for me. I've , I've, I've worked with people that just really want to help you to homes or, you know, work with editorial styling. So it's really important for them to fill it out . They can talk to me because, you know, at the moment, like say I'm doing 20 something , 20 houses on this makeup show, so I've got 20 contributors, which is what we called them. And this is the second series I've already done. First Aires , and you know , Pete , they are ranging from sort of normal people with salt , but just to people with large projects . So everyone, even with money, everyone's really, really nervous about changing their home , uh , because they're scared of spending the money and then it op get in bam . Right or so, it's just thought about how, if for me it's about being confident and showing them that you're confident with what you're saying, because if they feel like you're confident, then that they ultimately are going to feel more ease. Uh, went buy into your design . So, and you know, it's sort of taking them their ideas and molding it. I often think that a part of being a designer is also a bit like being a therapist. Rarely you have to really listen and really understand that , um , your homeowner or your client. For me it's about submersing my style into their mind. I'm thinking what would they want, but at the same time trying to push that boundaries or push that up imagination to kind of meet with how I like to design. So, you know, there's a lot that goes into, I think people underestimate the skill base that interior designers have to go through in order to get from start to finish.

Speaker 6:

Yeah. And interestingly , um, you talked about that whole, you know, pushing their boundaries. So, you know, without naming names, you've got 20 houses, you got 20 clients that you're making over. And I see, and I hear this a lot with interior designers, that they'll meet the client and they'll go, I want to be bald , I love color. And then all of a sudden they lose their ball bottle and they kind of end up going back to gray . Do you know what I mean? And like they'll have a cushion. Um , how do you coach and ha , you know, how, how would you inspire somebody to be, cause if you look on your grid, I think before we even, I was aware of you doing the Instagram. I think I commented on one of your rooms cause it was blue and it was shocking blue. I loved it. Um , my house is full of blue. Um, so that's , that's a three, a three a theme that runs through your grid. Um, how would you, how would you Koch somebody into using color into their, into their interiors?

Speaker 2:

Well, I think, you know, ultimately panning can be painted over and that's what, you know , this is why I tried to kind of style the conversation with and say, you know, what is the worst that can happen? And for me, I can work with any color, but it's all about the accessories. You fit into a space so you could walk into a room and have, you know, a really hideous sort of Magnolia on the wall. But if you use the right accessory is and the right pops of color tonally for that space, then you don't notice the fact that the Magnolia is there kind of in the background looking horrendous. But you know , they , for me color, I love using pops of color with accessories because those are things that can be changed. So if somebody is scared of painting a wall, green or paint snuggle orange, then I think rightK if I'm really not going to get that far with the, how can I bring h im some color o ut? Swear . So whoever it be on the cartoons, but for being abroad , whether it be on an accent chair, so added. And I think people, if they're really nervous about using color, they come around to the facts that are they having some really vibrant cushions. It's just about almost spoon feeding them and at the star. And I like to kind of, then when I'm dressing the space is bringing in a few bits of my own that I've kind of brought a lot without them to kind of pop in that just to see what their reaction is and see what they think are cause Ash Lee , what sort of room starts cutting together. You can then really start to understand why those decisions were made. So yeah, I think it's difficult sometimes it's a lot people has got to color, some people would like to use it differently. You know, you've got like Lucy, Tiffany you is totally bold that and it looks amazing. It's Sophie Robinson and then you've got some people that you know , like to use it in a more sort of , um, endowments of at different pops of color I suppose. And pops of colors used quite a lot in the industry. But I think it's, it's one of those things that really helps in the hearts of room. Um, so yeah, it's different. Different personalities really. It can be quite tricky, but sometimes they've restored back to quite neutral in tears. And I don't think there's anything wrong with that. I think, you know, the Scandinavian neutral would sort of very in right now. Um , and they can look with the blacks and the whites kind of just as beautiful as a colorful interior.

Speaker 6:

Yeah. How you, you know, you're doing these 12 and you know, I work in TV shows and I'm creative and sometimes because on your grid for example, you've got a very distinctive style. Like I said, it's very blue, very pops of orange, very vibrant. How are you trying to, how, how are you trying to make all of these 20 rooms look like they're not the same? Is that a challenge for you at the moment?

Speaker 2:

Wow. You know, I think that comes with just yes there is because I cannot make every single room look like Hawaii.

Speaker 6:

Okay .

Speaker 2:

Because they would just be 20 blue and orange room with the bow fit phone in that . So you know, for me it's about ultimately finding out about, Marco mentioned about being a therapist . I'm finding out about the homeowner is then our understanding, you know, there was so many different trends out there and different styles that you can go down. So I through years of crime, starting magazines and, and um , also interior styling. So I have to be quite adaptable, you know, I think that my Instagram is quite personable to me, my own style, but then when I'm starting for other people, that's not necessarily how I would approach their rooms or though I do like to pee in blue where I can because I just love it and everyone needs a bit of blue in their lives. So , um , yeah, it is one of those things, isn't it, where it's, it can be tricky with people when they're nervous, but I just think right, if they're not going to be , um , they're going to be too nervous to use color that why not make a statement for sort of new tools and just make some income a bit more elaborate? I just submit a, I'm not really a fan of boring , um, sort of bland interiors, which I don't think any of us are who are quite in the industry. Uh, but I just like to see something of that . But the bit that passed down to our space ,

Speaker 6:

no, absolutely. You talked about , uh, you teach interior design and I looked on your website, let's say I'm Nick snow interiors.co . Dot . UK and you do , um, online interior styling courses. So tell me a little bit about those and what they mean .

Speaker 2:

Yeah, so I've been doing that for about, probably coming up to two years now and I absolutely love it because I'd meet students from all over the world , um , and it's online. So it's an interactive online source of webcam and a microphone session . You know , I can have up to 15 students at any one tie and that runs for four weeks and it is an hour and a half of each week . And there are different time slots for when , um, when the courses are running. But it runs with the , uh, Towson school of arts and university of arts London. So, you know , it for me it was a really great platform to be able to , um, teach of , uh, uh, people who wouldn't be in the industry. And I think for me it is more of a , uh , industry expert teaching, you know, I'm not there to load you about a syllabus or I'm not there to kind of make you do loads of homework. Really it's about me , uh , giving my expertise and what I've experienced in the industry and at kind of guides and live on the path that they want to go on to . And if I can help them, I , I absolutely will. Um , and there's so many different avenues you could go down within terrorists dialing . And I think people think it's just one route, you know, just talking up some cushions. Uh, but absolutely, if not , that's totally two avenues. And whilst I was developing my career, I took a step down every single path. So I've kind of got the experience in visual merchandising, so home styling , you know, TV, art , directing, all of those different things. So if I can give my knowledge to someone who maybe just wants to go down one of those tabs, then you know, I feel that I've really helping someone else because I woke up one morning before I start my career having being a bank manager plates every day. So I, yeah, I wa I dealt with complaints every single day and I just woke up my morning and I thought, I can't do this anymore. I've always loved to tear to die . And I was raised to be a cliche , uh , but I'd always been interested in it , but I got stuck in that job where it was sort of a good income. It was easy, get paid the bills and, you know, myself , my other half, we, you know, went on those holidays and, and I just thought, you know, this actually isn't what I want out of life. So my story is really what I hope is quite inspiring to other people. And you know, I'm, I'm not, so I've met the kind of middle, I'd say , of my career or I'm not. Um, I've just had an expanding every day. And that's what, you know, I'm still down in the every day , um , as much as the next person. But if I can find somebody to take a step from their job that they just absolutely hate into a job that they absolutely love, then life's too short rains .

Speaker 6:

Oh absolutely. And I think, I think everyone now who I, who I know within this industry, you've almost got a portfolio career. So you know, I do a bit of everything, you know, so I do ideal home shows . I teach, I, you know, I do behind the scenes I do in front of the camera. So it's , and like from you saying your career, you , you do lots of different things to make, to create your brand, to create who Nick snow is now do with. What I've found really interesting is working on all the interior design, a great interior design challenge and interiors I masters and other interior design shows. You see all these contestants coming through and there's some people who are phenomenal designers, but they have no business acronym to it, you know, so that they don't know how to do that side of it. How have you managed to, you know, merge, you know, obviously you've got to be talented as a designer but also the back of house kind of stuff. What , what, what, what has been the biggest challenge for you doing both, doing all of that?

Speaker 2:

Well, I mean, I think a lot of people can agree, try, if you're such a creative person when it comes to bidding , business headed , um , is such that it's the most difficult part really for me. Um, and it's one of those things where I just asked for start . I just asked for help and I, you know, I asked the other designers and asked, I was stylish, no , for some advice, barely because you go into it completely blind , um , and starting off as a freelance, so you know, you don't really know what you should be charging. You don't know where to charge, what to charge or even how to charge. So I think out smoothly at the beginning you, you do kind of take a bit of a dock in a way because it's most the most important things to build a portfolio and to get a brand name out there. So it's made to accumulate me. So right at the start, you know, I will do jobs for peanuts, I would do jobs for just, you know, some exposure and then as the years go on and you start to grow, starts develop, the most important advice I can give to anyone is absolutely know your worth and don't have anyone walk all over you. Don't let anyone take advantage of you because your skill base is totally worth what you're charging for , uh , for your service. There's so, you know, it's , it's just about every day is different, which is why I love kind of being freelance or running my own brand. But there's , there's never a time when you can't stop working on it because the moment you stop working on it, there's the moment there could just all stop for you. So you've just got to have the determination and it can't get tired in sometimes , you know, it can get quite , um, you know, if you've, if you've got, had loads of , knows if you've had a note though , it can get quite tactile and you can think of giving up. But I just think if you're not having enough knows , you're not asking enough people . So you create and just got to be determined to do what you want in your life. If that's what you want to do. I've been freelance or running your own business is hard, but it's totally rewarding. You know, you're, you are your own.

Speaker 6:

Yeah , absolutely. Absolutely. Yeah. And who , um, who is , who's inspired you the most of the people you've worked with the longest?

Speaker 2:

Um , that's a hard question way because I just, there's , so I kind of take away something from everyone that I'd be, because I'm stuck . Even though I talk a lot, I'm , I listen a lot as well. So I , for me, I want started working with amazing starters called Maryann Cottrell and that she styles for living, et cetera. And she's just done fucked shit up though. She's done everyone . And I'm going back quite a few years ago, there was a competition with gimme, et cetera , which I entered and ended up winning it and she was one of the judges on that. And from that she kind of, we became really good friends and we worked together quite a lot. And you know, at the beginning I assisted her and she kind of taught me about not to be, you know, boring doesn't get you anywhere, you know, you've got to kind of think outside the box or stylist. And, and that's for me where I then developed from, I suppose when I first started , uh , interiors. Kenny Hoppin was someone that was probably one of the biggest known interior designers , um, in the industry , uh, with the , you , this was before she was kind of on TV, but she had a lot of books out and that's when I kind of actually got inspired by , um , really a tear. It's dye , but they're developing myself. I've been, I would have to say one of my favorite stock if not , and I think if you look on my feet or absolutely notice that I just love all of his , uh , ceramics that colors the pots , the colors. So I like to think that I , the British version of Jonathan up , although I can't do pop Reese

Speaker 6:

[inaudible]

Speaker 2:

[inaudible] for me, you know, I just , everyone that just, everyone that pushes themselves inspires me. I love to see someone that really thinks outside the box and likes to work really, really hard because you just don't get things given to a play.

Speaker 6:

No, absolutely. Just for my listeners, what will you know if you're around , um, being a stylist and working in the , in the industry where we're kind of surrounded by some quite influential people and people within this industry, what trends are in , dare I say trends cause everyone has a different take on what they like as interiors. What can you see coming up? What we , if you had a , um , I wanna pick you, pick your brains a little bit and tell me what you think is coming around the corner in , in design world.

Speaker 2:

Well, I think we're going to see a lot more space , um, sort of thing like colors and galaxy and you know, dark interiors . We've really metallic , um, and ovens to it. So I think there is, and as you mentioned, there's, there's trends. It's so subjective. And I did run a trends course , um, on a couple of years or a year or so ago and it didn't go that well because people I think don't like necessarily to follow trends because they , most of the thing , they have their own styles . So for me, one of the trends that will never go away is to connect tech and, and personality I think is one of the big things. But what I think what we can see the future is, you know, future, I say cutting up is mapped black. We're seeing that everywhere at the moment. And so, you know, we went through a stage of capo and frost stage of brass and then we're seeing a lot of matte black. And then I think we'll go into a lot more glass coming up like ripped glass and diffused glass. And I think we're going to sort of merge those elements and um , fab to see that marble is kind of fading away a little bit. Um , because I absolutely love marble .

Speaker 6:

Don't say that. Remember I'm about to do my bathroom and everything in my bathroom. I was like, I'm going to do marble, I'm going to do let the coppers and the goal. But actually that whole Matt , Matt black, I've got that whole critical window with the, you know, the ribbed glass that's all back in again now, isn't it? So we've seen that it's becoming more affordable. And, and interestingly, we were looking at, my misses are looking at taps for our bathroom and actually we go, we can't quite afford the Rose gold , but we could get the black one. So she pushed me in the way of going. I might go down the map black roots .

Speaker 2:

Oh yeah, no, definitely. I've just , I actually had one of the , uh , when the 20 contributors and they were very much like, no, and I was still a top and I just said some [inaudible] black is the way forward, so if you don't want to change any years time , I finished black ma ma black one now , um , and kind of worked that around there. So I think the actually things are a lot more affordable than what we think, how they're to be. Trent led or designed the lads , you know, there are great companies like the tour plumbing that do, you know, the matte black it really affordable process. Hope Mary, they do. Other brands are available obviously, but those sort of companies, they make it affordable to have it really trendy , um, designed that bathroom or kitchen. So, you know, and for me, trans difficult, I've , I really liked following trends and I look at them and see what's coming up, but I still think it supports stay true to your styles and give something a bit different if you can.

Speaker 6:

No, absolutely. Do you know Nick? I could talk to you forever, but uh , it's kinda , it's time. It's time for my , uh, my last question. So , um, I always ask my interiors to describe to me that it could be something you already have or something you aspire to have, but describe to me your favorite room and also tell me what you're drinking whilst you're in this favorite room.

Speaker 2:

Oh, well I'm gonna start off with the drink. Wait , I've sat there, we've got the champagne [inaudible]

Speaker 6:

and Adam's there with a cake . You're at your other half is there with the cake

Speaker 2:

Arjun Savage chocolate cake. Cause that sort of seems the E um , and I've though of glass of champagne could be stacked coats for harm , feel it. And I've got a cuff tile with maybe a folk eight , five blue vow that live out there so far. I mean that's just me with pops, the color and a bit of a neutral backdrop and I'm happy. I think we're, we're planning our wedding at the moment, so we're kind of thinking what do we do, where do we go and talk? The less time to read and eat just because of the colors. So, you know, if I'm just submersed in a blue room looking over a seat view, then I don't have , I've made it live with a gasp . Seco fine.

Speaker 6:

Fabulous. You're such a classic, classic classy bloke. Um, uh, if people were to , if people wanted to contact you, I've mentioned it a few times, but it's Nick snow interiors dot code at UK. And what's your social media handles?

Speaker 2:

So it is Apnix Loteria is a , that's my Instagram. So drop me a follow up. I've just had over 10,000 follower milestone , which is a maze thing . So I'm really pleased with that and just hopefully I would just keep inspiring people and , and actually make people use glue more a thing . I'm on a mission to make people use blue more in their homes, but uh , it doesn't need to be a cold color can actually be quite warm.

Speaker 6:

I love it. They are, all they need to do is just go, go onto your Instagram feed and you will see every different version of blue. But it just, he makes it look stunning. Nick , Nick's there. It's been an absolute pleasure. Thank you so much for talking to me.

Speaker 2:

A amazing way to fake Sovos . I've loved that .

Speaker 6:

How fabulous is next . Now you can just imagine him laying

Speaker 1:

on his chaise lounges, blue shades longe with his caftan and his champagne. What a cool guy. He's such a great, great conversation with him. Um, but that's the end of season two of the TV carpenter podcast. Don't worry, I'll be coming back for season three, but what I tend to do at the end of every season is I do a two week best of. So , um , over the next two weeks I will be doing , uh, just the, the best of the TV carpenter . So I'll be doing snippets from each episode , uh , sharing those precious gems of knowledge that people have shared with us. Um , so yes , so tune in next week to listen to that and the following week, but also I will be doing the , um, the revealing the winners of the idol Hampshire competition. So all you have to do is go to your iTunes and click subscribe and leave me a comment and I'll randomly pick two winners who will receive a pair of tickets each. And don't forget, again, with thorn down my sponsor, if you go to thorn down.co . Dot. UK and type in the code T V carpenter, you will receive 15% discount on any of that on my products. Wow. Season two done, done and dusted, and that it all began with season three, which should be a really crazy, crazy season, especially with the whole ideal home show and the live recordings. Um , I'm looking forward to, to where the next season is going to take us. But for now, all I have to say is, thank you for listening to the TV carpenter.